How The Russian Presidential Election Works

  • Rusia
  • 0
  • 239 Views
  • 27 December 2017

Since 2008, Russian presidents are directly elected to a six-year term and are limited to serving a maximum of two.

The Russian president is elected in a two round system. The first round (March 18) features all registered candidates on the ballot. If no candidate reaches a majority of votes, the second round takes place three weeks later and is a run-off between the two candidates with the highest vote.

Political parties with representation in the Duma (Russian parliament) are free to nominate a candidate to run. Registered political parties with no national representation must collect 100,000 signatures to nominate a candidate. There are currently sixty-seven registered parties, who have the right to nominate a candidate. Meanwhile, independent candidates need 300,000 signatures, with at least 7,500 from each federal district[1].

The election campaign officially begins when the resolution is approved by the Duma’s upper house; this happened December 15 2017. Once approved, all parties have twenty-five days to register their nominees, who must submit the required documents. These include identification, bank statements, registered property abroad and information of any criminal convictions.

For the 2018 election, twenty-three candidates have so far expressed interest in running. The most notable candidates will be incumbent, Vladimir Putin, Pavel Grudinin (Communist), Vladimir Zhirinovsky (Liberal Democrat), Grigory Yavlinsky (Yabloko) and Ksenia Sobchak (Civic Platform).

Although President Putin has previously been a member and leader of the largest political party, United Russia, he is running as an independent. However, his candidacy has been endorsed by several political parties, including United Russia and two other parties with national representation. These are “A Just Russia” and “Rodina”, who will not nominate their own candidates.

An unwritten rule is that sitting presidents are not members of any political party, including that which nominated them. No Russian president to date has been a member of a political party whilst in office.

The ballot paper will be finalised in February 2018 with all the candidates listed in alphabetical order. Russians also have an option to vote for ‘none of the above’. Voting is not compulsory for any Russian election.

In accordance with Russian law, the media begins proper coverage twenty-eight days before Election Day. Registered candidates may have free airtime on all national and local state-run TV channels. There will also be televised debates and special election programs.

Candidates who work in municipal or civil service jobs must take annual leave until the election is over.

On Election Day, voting lasts until 8.00 pm local time across eleven time zones at 96,000 polling stations. The electoral commission then counts the ballots with international observers watching the process. The results will be uploaded onto a voting count system called GAS Vybory.

More than 110 million Russians are eligible to vote in 2018. The average turnout in previous presidential elections was 68.6%.

[1] Federal Districts are groupings of several Federal Subjects of the Russian Federation. They exist for the convenience of governing and carrying out orders from the Presidential Administration, and have no constitutional provisions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Solve : *
27 × 15 =


Who is Ksenia Sobchak?

  • 0
  • 248 Views
  • 30 December 2017

An unlikely presidential candidate, in 2017 socialite and TV personality, Ksenia Sobchak, announced her intention to run in the Russian Presidential Election 2018. She claimed this would be an ‘against all’[1] bid for the presidency.

Ksenia Sobchak will be the first woman to run for the Russian presidency in fourteen years. This move was greeted with cynicism and intrigue in Russia and the W

citește mai mult

How The Russian Presidential Election Works

  • 0
  • 239 Views
  • 27 December 2017

Since 2008, Russian presidents are directly elected to a six-year term and are limited to serving a maximum of two.

The Russian president is elected in a two round system. The first round (March 18) features all registered candidates on the ballot. If no candidate reaches a majority of votes, the second round takes place three weeks later and is a run-off between the two candidates with the highest vote.

citește mai mult

Russia: Four Things to Watch in 2018

  • 0
  • 201 Views
  • 22 December 2017

1. Putin's Probable Re-election

The 2018 presidential election is not so much about who will win, but who will later succeed Putin. According to the Russian constitution, Putin has one six-year term remaining. By the end of this term (2024), he will be in his 70s.

There appears no obvious successor emerging in the background. However, Putin himself was never expected to succeed Boris Yeltsin. This has led many commenta

citește mai mult

What Can Democrats Learn From Alabama’s Doug Jones?

  • 0
  • 211 Views
  • 30 November 2017

In ordinary circumstances, Doug Jones would already be preparing to move to Washington DC. The former prosecutor famous for convicting KKK members for a church bombing is up against gay bashing, God and gun lovin’, twice kicked out of elected office, Judge Roy Moore. A man who has eight accusers of sexual assault, all of whom were underage at the time of the allegations.

Yet, if one looks at all the recent polls, they show a ti

citește mai mult

Azerbaidjanul, petrolul și românii

  • 0
  • 787 Views
  • 7 October 2016

Întotdeauna, statele sunt nevoite să își apere poziția pe marea tablă a geopoliticii, uitându-se cu grijă la vecini, dar și la puterile regionale. Această regulă presupune nu doar poziția ofensivă, ci și valorificare atuurilor, astfel încât să devină piese care contează pe „câmpul de analiză”, iar nu elemente neglijabile, care sunt măturate dintr-o dată de cei ce au suficientă putere să mânuiască piesele.

Caucazul, ca regiune geopolitică, nu face nici ea excepție

citește mai mult

1025 de ani de ortodoxie la Nipru și Volga

  • 0
  • 886 Views
  • 7 October 2016

De curând s-a sărbătorit un eveniment istoric, care a avut anumite consecințe pe scena politicii regionale: 1025 de la momentul în care prințul Vladimir al Kievului a dat ordin ca întreaga populație a statului pe care îl conducea să se boteze în rit ortodox.

Operațiunea a reușit cumva, deși o lungă perioadă au coexistat și credințele păgâne în anumiți zei ai pădurii, ceea ce nu este surprinzător, deoarece nu se poate realiza în

citește mai mult

Coreea: calcule și efecte

  • 1
  • 260 Views
  • 17 September 2017

Pe 9 martie 2017 scriam despre criza din peninsula Coreea câteva opinii  http://adevarul.ro/international/in-lume/coreea-nord-ecuatia-geopolitica-scurt-issim-1_58c122ad5ab6550cb82913f9/index.html , iar ultimul paragraf era acesta: „Contextul personal al liderului nord-coreean face să fie astăzi mai probabilă o criză acută aici, d

citește mai mult

The Left’s Elusive Message: Old hats are still old, the Anglo-American case (part II)

  • 0
  • 200 Views
  • 12 September 2017

The phrase ‘old hat’, as one would expect, means something that is tediously familiar or outdated. Yet, walking through Shoreditch or Brooklyn, old hats seem stylish. What the owners of such hats probably aren’t willing to admit is that they paid around five times what the original owner did. This could be a metaphor for the political climate in the US and UK today.

Last week I wrote about who the left in British and American p

citește mai mult

The Left’s Elusive Voters: The Anglo – American Case

  • 0
  • 189 Views
  • 3 September 2017

Anyone paying attention to the US Senate race in 2018 will know the Democrats have a huge problem on their hands; most seats up for reelection are not just held by Democrat incumbents, they are in states that Donald Trump carried by large margins.

Across the pond this summer, those paying attention (who are not die hard Jeremy Corbyn fans) can also point to why Labour lost; they didn’t talk to the middle classes or what I senti

citește mai mult